Why This Season Is the Perfect Time to Start Your Victory Garden

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Maximize The Gardening Space & Time You Have

Back in World War I, Europe had a huge food shortage, which prompted the creation of the National War Garden Commission. What resulted was American civilians growing fruits and vegetables to feed themselves so commercial agriculture could export to the European allies. They were called “victory gardens”. While we’re not currently in a physical war, it’s certainly a good idea to start victory gardens again. In our war against the novel coronavirus, picking up gardening as a hobby to bring homegrown food to the table can certainly be a fulfilling achievement!

Considering it’s summer, it’s the perfect time to start a victory garden if you don’t already have one. Here’s a quick guide to starting one!

Victory Garden Basics

You want to maximize the gardening space and time you have. Certain fruits and vegetables will grow within a specific timeframe. So you want to do your basic planning and ensure you stagger your plants in the most optimal fashion possible.

Traditionally, people would grow things like carrots, cabbage, lettuce, kale, tomatoes, beans, squashes, turnips, peas, and beets in their victory gardens. So those are great ones to start with.

No matter what you choose to grow, stagger them out so you get a good rhythm going where you can harvest your plants, eat your harvest in a short time, and have another harvest ready by the time you’re done consuming all your fruits and/or veggies. For example, plant 5 heads of lettuce at a time instead of 20 to reduce food waste.

Seasons for Crops

As we mentioned above, there are different seasons for various crops. If you want carrots, peas, lettuce, or kale, then it may be too late to plant them, as those are best planted during early spring.

The best crops to plant for summer include beans, corn, eggplants, peppers, squashes, tomatoes, basils and other herb plants. For the fall and even winter, think about planting lettuce, arugula, carrots, broccoli, beets, spinach, and parsley.

Come up With a List of Your Favored Plants

Not everyone will like every single fruit or vegetable, and that’s ok. Sit down with your family and determine which ones most of you like.

Then, with that list, determine how many of each you want to plant in your victory garden. If you want to try your hand at pickling anything, make sure to grow extra to account for that. For those just starting out or those with limited space; herbs are a great choice to grow. Herbs enhance flavor in all foods, from salads to steaks. Adding fresh herbs make food taste better! Herbs are versatile; each has its own growth habits and environmental needs. Select the herbs you will use; then find a spot where they can thrive and remain hardy when a few clippings are needed. 

Plant a Victory Garden for Fun With Your Family

As you can see, creating a victory garden serves many purposes. Not only can you get the satisfaction of growing your own fruits and veggies, but it can also be a fun pastime to do with your family members.

So get to researching potential crops to grow, order the seeds and any equipment you need, and have a blast for the foreseeable future!

Are you ready to start your victory garden? Then browse our selection of herb plants now!

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Maximize The Gardening Space & Time You Have

Tips For Growing Herb Plants Indoors

Tips For Growing Herb Plants Indoors

Pre-Order Indoor Plants

These plants ship in the Fall, pre-order today as plants will not last! 

Light:

Light is the most crucial element for their success ~ even direct light is a challenge in the winter when intensity is reduced.  Your herbs will need at least 6 to 8 hours of indirect sun a day (for the most light needy herbs, the ones that say ‘bright light’ or ‘full sun’).  There are those that recommend acclimating your plants to lower light by gradually adjusting them to lower light conditions.  Great idea, but ‘ain’t going to happen’ in my case.  My space gets morning and afternoon sun, so I am lucky in that we are talking 8 hours per day.  You can use grow lights, but since I have no experience with them, a Google search is advised.  You are going to see a few changes in the plants due to this decrease in light:  your herbs may drop a few leaves.  The plant is actually shedding its more inefficient leaves by producing more efficient leaves higher up, closer to the light source.  The plant may get a big leggier as it reaches for the light.  I recommend that you turn the plant periodically so that it receives light on all sides;   you’ll know it is time as the plant will ‘lean toward the light’.

Water:

‘Not too much, not too little, just right’.  That is hard when they come indoors.  The really trick is to find that balance.  In general, begin to water LESS often and MORE thoroughly.  Make sure that the soil is dry to the touch before watering, and when you water, make sure that the water runs out of the pot.  Drainage is key, so make sure that you use a well-draining pot.  My favorite pots are your run of the mill, red clay pot.  If you plants are small, a 6” pot will be perfect.  And, make sure that you are using a quality potting soil.  Not making a ‘plug’ for one soil over another, but Miracle Grow makes a good indoor mix that we’ve used for a few years.

Food:

Although we aren’t big promoters of fertilizer ‘in the field’, we do recommend a nice supplementary feeding when your plants are confined to a pot, growing indoors.  Again, just our recommendation ~ a top quality fish emulsion every 2 weeks when the plants are in their ‘grow phase’.  Stinky but effective!

Pests and Diseases:

No one wants to think that they are harboring these ‘nasties’ but you’ll never know what can be lurking inside.  Actually, some of these pests may just piggyback on your plants as they come home to roost.  Bottom line:  be vigilant.  I used to wait to act, but now I’m encouraging everyone to ‘be proactive, not reactive’.  Herbs are more susceptible to common pests when growing indoors, so keep your eyes open for whiteflies, spider mites, aphids, mealy bugs and the WORST of all – scale insects!  I’ve begun a routine of regular spraying with an insecticidal soap.  If it works in the greenhouse, it should work on my sun porch.  There are a number of safe and effective products out there, so take a look.

Accepting the Indoor Challenge

I’ll be the first to admit it:  growing herbs indoors is not as easy as growing them outdoors.  But, rest assured, it can be done.  Since I have a lot of greenhouse space, plenty of light and water and 24/7 attention, I never felt the need to grow them indoors, at home.  But, over the years, as your questions about indoor growing became more numerous and specific, I began to grow more and more of them in our bright little ‘life of it’ room (named by my then 6 year old son, who on a cold wintery day, proclaimed that our warm sunny haven was ‘the life of it’) – not sure where that came from, but it stuck.  Twenty -three years later, it’s still bright and sunny and filled with herbs ferns, gardenias and a lot of citrus trees and bushes.

Our room is glass, on three sides, and has an east, south and west exposure;  basically we have a lot of light all day.  We have an old fashioned radiator backed up by a small baseboard electric heater.  I am always out there, watering, cleaning, trimming and keeping a sharp eye out for any potential pests.  So, the basics: light, heat, water and lots of attention.  I do a weekly spraying with a ‘safe’ pesticide made from … herbs!

The second vital component is knowing which herbs do best indoors.  We try to be specific on our site, and try to provide information on why some herbs do well indoors and why others should not be grown indoors.  Do yourself a favor and take our advice.  

Start small and try to pick three or four of your favorites – the ones you will use.  I’d suggest mint, parsley, oregano and thyme.  Rosemary and lavender are a bit trickier but they can be successfully grown indoors remembering that lavenders must dry out well between waterings.  A note of cautions – make sure that you don’t crowd out your plants, as good air flow between plants is a must.

How to Grow an Eco-Friendly Balcony or Rooftop Food Garden

How to Grow an Eco-Friendly Balcony or Rooftop Food Garden

You have the opportunity to reduce your greenhouse gas emissions, improve your health, reduce waste, and save water, even if you live in a city. How?

By building your own balcony or rooftop food garden.

By 2050, it’s estimated the world’s population will increase by more than 35 percent. To realistically feed everyone, the world’s crop production would need to double.

But placing that burden entirely on farmers when more than 55% of people now live in urbanized areas isn’t practical – nor is it necessary! Step out onto your balcony or patio, and you’ve found a perfect setting to grow food. (more…)

25 Best Herbs to Grow in Your Kitchen Garden

25 Best Herbs to Grow in Your Kitchen Garden

Whether you want to grow a kitchen herb garden as a hobby or to save money or just for healthier eating, there are plenty of herbs you can grow in your backyard, on your patio or even in your windowsill. Fresh herbs make recipes taste even better and are great to have around for soups, stews, and salads.

In picking a place to grow your herbs, keep in mind that they need a good four to six hours of sun daily. There are many herbs that you can grow to enhance your cooking. When you plant a kitchen garden, don’t only plant the herbs you know, take a chance on something else. You might just be surprised. (more…)

Potted Herbs Make Great Indoor Accents

Potted Herbs Make Great Indoor Accents

To keep our test garden growing strong through the winter, we’ve moved some of our favorite herbs indoors. Our sun porch has become a haven for potted herbs and one of our favorite places to take a break or eat our lunches. Receiving lots of sunlight, our potted garden has been thriving throughout this mild winter here in zone 7. Watering about once a week, our plants are showing lots of healthy new growth and it’s not even spring!

What started as a project to see what temperature and lighting worked best for these potted herbs, has now developed into a lovely place to relax and find a moment of peace during the day. Having these plants close at hand makes cooking and crafting even more enjoyable. Bring natural beauty and energy to your home with two of our favorite fragrant and functional potted herbs!

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Indoor Herb Plants: Don’t Go… Grow!

Indoor Herb Plants: Don’t Go… Grow!

This past weekend was spent preparing my 12 favorite herbs for their trip back indoors.  All spring, summer and into fall, they have enjoyed a life of rugged survival.  Hot, humid days and pounding rain storms.  Hot sun, thirsty days and most made it through my vacation when they were ‘on their own’.  They were attacked by slugs, munched on by unknown critters (in my yard, it could be anything) and of course cut back at any conceivable time for summer recipes.  They made it.  Rough around the edges, but survivors.

Now comes the real test;  can the herb plants survive the transition from their ‘wilderness experience’ to the lush confines of my glassed in porch.  Life is actually going to be more challenging indoors where they will have to contend with less light, more pests and of course, overzealous gardening!  However, they survived the fall and winter, so I am hopeful.  However, here are a few things I need to remember: (more…)