Fall Into The Perfect Culinary Herb Garden

Fall Into The Perfect Culinary Herb Garden

22 Culinary Herbs You Should Be Growing Now

Cooler weather is on its way, and for many, the drop in temperature brings with it a pull toward the kitchen and a longing to create the perfect culinary masterpiece. Make sure that your cooking space is well-stocked this year with culinary herbs you can harvest from your own fall garden. And if you’ve never cooked with fresh culinary herbs before, you have no idea what you’re missing! Planting herbs in the autumn months means they will be growing in the cool weather they like best. Instead of scorching in the hot summer sun, your herbs are sure to thrill you with how well they thrive.

Short on gardening space? Culinary herb plants tend to love growing in unique container planters, window boxes or even on balconies. No matter how you manage to find the space, having the right herbs ready for your next foray into cooking can make all the difference. Take time to learn about some must-have culinary herbs that are sure to flourish in your fall garden, those that will grow much better in an indoor container, and herbs that are best harvested in the summer and fall, to be preserved for use during the winter months. (more…)

The Ultimate Guide to Patchouli

The Ultimate Guide to Patchouli

Patchouli is a plant species from the Lamianceae family, which also includes lavender, oregano, and mint. Although its scientific name is Pogostemon cablin, this perennial herb is more commonly known as stink weed, pucha pot, or putcha-pat. With so many names comes many uses, and patchouli’s potent aroma is what makes it a hot commodity among herb lovers today. It’s used for everything from aromatherapy to perfume and repellent.

Characteristics of Patchouli

Patchouli is native to Southeast Asia but is now cultivated throughout China, India, and parts of western Africa. It’s one of the bushier herbs and typically features a firm stem and small pale pink flowers. The plant averages two to three feet in length. (more…)

Why You Shouldn’t Push Parsley Aside Anymore

Why You Shouldn’t Push Parsley Aside Anymore

If you asked most people what role they thought that parsley plays in cooking, health and nutrition, they would most likely say that it is used as a garnish or decoration for other foods. It is that often ignored tuft of green bits on your plate that you have, for many years, pushed to the side in lieu of devouring everything else. This is done without a thought or care and those who make it a habit almost assuredly aren’t aware of what they are missing.

Parsley originated in southern Europe along the Mediterranean and prior to ever being thought of as food, parsley was consumed as medicine. Parsley is an extremely nutritious herb that can be easily grown in your own culinary or healing herb garden. Unbeknownst to most folks, parsley is the most popular and widely used herb in the world.

The biennial plant gets its name from the Greek word for “rock celery” and contains high levels of vitamins K, C & A as well as respectable amounts of iron and potassium. If you were ever curious about what parsley can do for you keep reading to find out the benefits you’ve been forgoing by pushing aside this little green herbal dynamo. (more…)

The Importance of Soil: The Foundation of Your Garden

The Importance of Soil: The Foundation of Your Garden

As counter-intuitive as this sounds, I know much more about my online customer’s gardens that are literally hundreds and thousands of miles away from my greenhouses than I knew about gardens belonging to my bricks and mortar customers, whose gardens were sometimes less than a mile from my store!

The technology that allows you to send that incredible looking meal to your Facebook friends is the technology that allows my customers to share their gardening experiences, both good and bad. Got a problem, no problem ~ send me a photo! Within minutes, we are able to review, assess and get back to the customer with hopefully a suggestion or a remedy that will ensure complete success.

But, there are times when there is nothing I can do short of pulling out my hair (well, that’s not a good option any longer) or screaming in frustration. It’s usually about the soil. Yes, one or two photos can tell a scary story and there have been times when it’s too late to offer a remedy; the damage has been done. Soil feeds a plant, and when you have crummy soil, completely depleted of nutrients or clay soil that clings to the roots and basically destroys them, plants will die. (more…)

Everything You Wanted to Know About Plant Hardiness Zones (*but were afraid to ask)

Everything You Wanted to Know About Plant Hardiness Zones (*but were afraid to ask)

You’ve Seen the Pretty Colors, on the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map So What Do They Mean?

The USDA and Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum established a set of guidelines, a Zone Map, to help gardeners figure out how well a particular plant would survive the winter cold in their particular area. The first zone map was created in 1960, followed by a revision in 1990; both used historical weather patterns, and the Hardiness Zone Map was created dividing the US into 13 Zones. Looking at these earlier maps, you can see that each hardiness zone differs by 10F. The ‘Gold Standard’, the current map, was updated in 2012 using sophisticated methods and equipment; the new version added 2 new zones (12 and 13) and further divided into 5 degree Fahrenheit zones using “A” and “B”. This version includes a “find your zone by zip code” feature – a pop up box will provide the zone, giving gardeners the exact coldest average temperature for the zip code, and the latitude and longitude.

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Indoor Herb Plants: Don’t Go… Grow!

Indoor Herb Plants: Don’t Go… Grow!

This past weekend was spent preparing my 12 favorite herbs for their trip back indoors.  All spring, summer and into fall, they have enjoyed a life of rugged survival.  Hot, humid days and pounding rain storms.  Hot sun, thirsty days and most made it through my vacation when they were ‘on their own’.  They were attacked by slugs, munched on by unknown critters (in my yard, it could be anything) and of course cut back at any conceivable time for summer recipes.  They made it.  Rough around the edges, but survivors.

Now comes the real test;  can the herb plants survive the transition from their ‘wilderness experience’ to the lush confines of my glassed in porch.  Life is actually going to be more challenging indoors where they will have to contend with less light, more pests and of course, overzealous gardening!  However, they survived the fall and winter of 2015 so I am hopeful.  However, here are a few things I need to remember: (more…)