Herbs Associated with Halloween

Herbs Associated with Halloween

Folks in my neighborhood have taken Halloween to a whole new level;  it is incredible what a bit of technology will do for a holiday. Back in my time, we’d have a Casper mask with an elastic strap.  Very hard to breathe in that thing, so you were forever lifting it up for a breath of fresh air. Moms gave away homemade popcorn balls and candy apples.  You knew who was going to have the ‘good stuff’ (Milky Way bars were a favorite) and who to avoid (the elderly neighbor who thought handing out pennies was acceptable).  Gone are those days – we’ve got big scary spiders climbing up the sides of houses, and tombstones with automated skeletons waving from the ground. According to the National Retail Federation, Americans spent close to 9 billion dollars on Halloween in 2018.

But, the origins of Halloween have little to do with candy and zombie costumes.  Most of the ancient festivals associated with Halloween had to do with the harvest and magic.  The Halloween that we celebrate today didn’t arrive along a single path; it is a combination of traditions that tie transitioning seasons to the thin layer between life and death.  All of these traditions, the broomstick, the apples, the witches, have ancient roots. No image of Halloween is complete without witches and broomsticks, and when it comes to witches, we need to talk about HERBS! (more…)

An Introductory Guide to Ayurvedic Herbs

An Introductory Guide to Ayurvedic Herbs

The practice of Ayurvedic medicine originated in India thousands of years ago. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, the term Ayurveda is a combination of two Sanskrit words: ayur meaning life and veda meaning science or knowledge. Ayurveda therefore literally means the science and knowledge of life.

Many Ayurvedic practices became established long before the advent of written records, having been passed down through the generations by word of mouth. What constitutes the Ayurvedic Herbs Guide are three ancient books on Ayurvedic medicine, the Charaka Samhita, the Sushruta Samhita and the Astanga Hridaya, were written in Sanskrit over 2,000 years ago and are known as the Great Trilogy.

In its Benchmarks for Training in Ayurveda, the World Health Organization states that there are two types of Ayurveda experts: practitioners and dispensers. Within the practitioner category are two types of therapists: Ayurveda dieticians and panchakarma therapists. The former provide dietary counseling and make herbal recommendations. The latter provides a five-fold detoxification treatment involving massage, herbal therapy and other procedures. Again it’s a literal translation; pancha means five and karma means treatment. (more…)

10 Interesting, Unique Herbs & What to Do With Them

10 Interesting, Unique Herbs & What to Do With Them

The uses for herbs are extremely varied and widespread. While some cultures use herbs primarily in the kitchen, others use herbs as alternative approaches to healing or spiritual and ceremonial accompaniments.

Each herb has an interesting and unique history of both traditional and modern use, and you could spend days learning about one special herb in depth. Let’s take the shortcut and take a look at 10 unique herbs and explore some ideas about what to do with them. As always, be sure to consult your healthcare professional before using any herbs medicinally. (more…)

Harvesting Herbs in the Fall

Harvesting Herbs in the Fall

It is that time of year again. We spent months anxiously awaiting the first signs of spring – your perennial herbs emerging or warm enough weather for annuals. And, because we sell to every conceivable zone in the continental US that ‘just right time’ spans months. For us in Zone 7, we try to wait until ‘Tax Day’ but don’t always make it!

From Spring to Fall

Nevertheless, spring arrives and the fun begins – the act of planning shifts to actual planting, and more planting followed by pruning and tending and clipping. Using your herbs in all sorts of ways, because all we know, herbs are so versatile. All summer to enjoy the fresh taste of mint in tea, fresh basil on your Caprese salad, real dill on your grilled fish, tarragon chicken salad and a farm fresh chicken stuff full of fresh Bouquet Garni. We’ve done it all! For our clever DIY customers, the fun never ends while our homeopathic friends are creating all sorts of healing ointments, tinctures and teas.

But, we can all sense the change. Days are shortening, Helianthus and Joe Pye Weed are announcing the arrival of cooler nights. Fewer butterflies on fewer blooms. No more delighting in hummingbirds at the feeders. (more…)

25 Best Herbs to Grow in Your Kitchen Garden

25 Best Herbs to Grow in Your Kitchen Garden

Whether you want to grow a kitchen herb garden as a hobby or to save money or just for healthier eating, there are plenty of herbs you can grow in your backyard, on your patio or even in your windowsill. Fresh herbs make recipes taste even better and are great to have around for soups, stews, and salads.

In picking a place to grow your herbs, keep in mind that they need a good four to six hours of sun daily. There are many herbs that you can grow to enhance your cooking. When you plant a kitchen garden, don’t only plant the herbs you know, take a chance on something else. You might just be surprised. (more…)

Rare and Unusual:  Rau Ram – Vietnamese Coriander Summer Salsa Recipe

Rare and Unusual: Rau Ram – Vietnamese Coriander Summer Salsa Recipe

The Growers Exchange prides itself on our large and diverse offerings of plants; we are now selling over 175 different types of herbs and we are adding more each season! In addition to our ‘usual suspects’ we are known as a source for the more hard to find herbs, the rare and unusual. We love introducing our customers to these plants, as you will not find them in your big box garden centers, but they are a must have for gardeners that appreciate and support the broader offerings of the world of herbs.

An herb that we have grown for years, Vietnamese Coriander has been growing in popularity along with our exposure to and demand for more unusual foods from around the world. Also known as Rau Ram, this herb is well known in Vietnamese cooking. Often pronounced as ‘zow-zam’, it is used as a cilantro substitute ~ sort of a ‘citrusy cousin’! The taste is quite similar, but we find it to be more lemony, more peppery with a bit more punch! Actually, it is well known throughout Southeast Asia. In Malaysia, the plant is known as laksa and often served there as a condiment, along with basil. (more…)