Nasturtiums are typically started from seed– but why do the sowing yourself, when we are happy to sow them for you?  While most of the country is experiencing another record-setting snowy winter, your nasturtiums are in good hands here on the farm, safe in our warm and well-tended greenhouse. While most people are ordering seeds that ship immediately, we’re nurturing and hand tending our plants with care until it is warm enough to ship them via mail couriers like Fedex, this spring. This way, you get healthy, happy plants that arrive on your doorstep and are ready to plant or pot, instead of seeds that have battled the rigors of the icy weather AND the postal system. Our nasturtiums are a great example. Below, see us starting these little guys on their life journey.

Sowing Nasturtium seeds

When spring arrives at last and you receive your Nasturtiums, plant them in well-drained soil and full sun.  They are easy to grow, and do not require a lot of maintenance.  In fact, they do better with a little neglect.  They like weekly waterings, or whenever soil is dry to the touch.

Nasturtium leaves have an interesting watercress flavor to them, and are a wonderful addition to salads and cheese sandwiches.  Use them to spice up cream cheeses, dips, or egg dishes.  Colorful nasturtium flowers are not only beautiful, but are also edible.  Many health food stores carry these edible flowers– but at a high price!  Take advantage of your nasturtiums by picking their flowers soon after they open up.  The flowers can be served whole as a gorgeous decoration to cakes, or petals can be sprinkled on salads.

If you would rather keep your blooms on your plant, be sure to remember to pick off dead blooms.  This will allow your nasturtium to bloom continuously.  If you don’t dead-head them, they will start to go to seed, as our social director Caroline recently discovered! You can read about her experience in our previous blog. These seeds can also be pickled and used as you would use capers.

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